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Offline Milko

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Airplanes - Situation
« on: January 20, 2015, 03:36:28 PM »
Hello

Attached you can see the current status of the aircraft of the pak. There are two graphs, one showing the aircraft available in different periods. It seems to me that with regard to passenger planes, the situation is fairly quiet, generally (except in rare periods) there are two or more planes to choose from.

For aircraft postal there is less variety and a single hole (one or two months) between the Bristol 170 and subsequent. Generally, however, the historical period is all covered.

What do you think? Starting from the above you have any suggestions of aircraft to be included?

Giuseppe

Offline jamespetts gb

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Re: Airplanes - Situation
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2015, 08:07:52 PM »
This is an interesting graph indeed! I tend to take a slightly different approach to looking at vehicle creation, and emphasise the importance of variety in vehicles to reflect the different functions that different vehicles actually performed.

We are missing a number of things that have no direct equivalents in the pakset, including very early jet liners (i.e., the Comet), four engined piston propeller aircraft (such as the DC-4 and later DC-6 and DC-7), early high speed subsonic jets (such as the Vickers VC-10), three-engined wide-bodied aircraft (such as the Lockheed Tri-Star or DC-10), medium sized quad jet long distance aircraft (such as the Airbus A340), and modern long-distance wide-bodied twin jets, such as the Boeing 777. Also missing are the latest generation of aircraft accross a number of classes, including the Airbus A380, Boeing 747-8, Airbus A350, Airbus A330 and Boeing 787, which are all significant for their lower operating costs and/or higher capacities than their predecessors.

Of all those, the greatest priority, I think, are the four engined piston propeller aircraft of the 1930s-1950s, as there are currently no higher capacity aircraft in that time frame at all.

Offline Milko

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Re: Airplanes - Situation
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2015, 08:16:03 PM »
Hello James

My first goal was to give temporal continuity, in this way, for each year, there is provided at least one plane. Now it's time to actually work on the variety.

Just today I started to collect the data of DC6, that I will do in the two main versions, to cover 12 years of history.

 The DC4 is interesting, but it was produced for only five years and then have a moment blocked.

   The comet is a basic plane, the first of its sector. The comet certainly deserves to be done.

Giuseppe

Offline jamespetts gb

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Re: Airplanes - Situation
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2015, 09:15:16 PM »
Ahh, yes, I see your strategy there, which seems entirely sensible, and it is somewhat exciting that we are now moving into phase II of aircraft production. As to the DC-4, that would be a good thing to have one day, as I know that BOAC used them, but we would still be missing the first five or so years of the use of four engined propeller aircraft: perhaps the [urr=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_Constellation]Lockheed Constellation[/url], of which over 800 were built and which was also used extensively by BOAC, would be a good choice for an earlier 4 engined design, entering service in 1943. One advantage of the DC-4, however, might be that it would require less effort to adapt to/from graphics for the DC-6 and DC-7, although you would know more than I just how much work might actually be saved this way.

Offline Milko

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Re: Airplanes - Situation
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2015, 09:23:37 PM »
Hello

One advantage of the DC-4, however, might be that it would require less effort to adapt to/from graphics for the DC-6 and DC-7, although you would know more than I just how much work might actually be saved this way.

True, you're right, at this point I will start from the DC4 (or the DC6), so then I can do the two others quickly.

Giuseppe

Offline jamespetts gb

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Re: Airplanes - Situation
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2015, 09:31:19 PM »
I have found the approach of making lots of variants from specific bases to be very efficient in other vehicles (e.g., trains).

Offline jamespetts gb

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Re: Airplanes - Situation
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2015, 11:42:30 PM »
One other Douglas propeller variant that you might consider is the Canadair North Star, a re-engined DC-4 used extensively by BOAC: it was faster and more powerful than a normal DC-4, but noisier (hence lower comfort), and probably more expensive to build and run, too. The fuselage would have been identical, only with a slightly different appearance on the engines, so this would require minimal graphical differences from the normal DC-4.