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Author Topic: Shawty  (Read 716 times)

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Offline Isaac.Eiland-Hall us

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Offline Ters

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2019, 08:32:32 PM »
I wonder if this is a maintenance trailer that is about that short, and bit taller: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tryvandsbanen_-_no-nb_digifoto_20160406_00010_NB_NS_NM_08590.jpg I can't tell if it has wheels, is something built on a longer flatcar, or a static structure.
Slightly longer trailers carrying passengers: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Holmenkollbanen_1900_-_Oslo_byarkiv_-_A-40203-Uaa-0002-063.jpg
Another cute little trailer, but for freight: https://jernbane.net/bo/subpage.php?s=3&t=14340 It's for use on regular railroad, for baggage and light goods on a railcar service.

Offline Isaac.Eiland-Hall us

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2019, 09:03:47 PM »
Alas, someone in the reddit thread posted another picture with the numbered car visible - it's a full car in reality.

But I love the links you posted! Especially the third one - it's so cute! 😂

Offline Freahk

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2019, 11:22:13 PM »
Yet another cute one

The bike carryage of the Stuttgarter "Zacke" which is a rack railway.

Offline Isaac.Eiland-Hall us

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2019, 05:45:08 AM »
Wow, that's a really great idea! I see bike racks on busses sometimes, but it's usually only able to hold one or two - I always wonder about that - what happens when you depend on it and others are using them?

That's awesome!

I really wish we had trams / light rail everywhere here. Busses are never as great. But we're also too spread out and dependent on cars here. It's hard.

Offline Ters

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2019, 05:00:55 PM »
Norwegian trams had ski racks: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Voksenkollen_-_no-nb_digifoto_20150206_00009_NB_MIT_FNR_15855.jpg On that tram line at least (same as my second link). The line might in fact only have existed for that reason. The tram line in Trondheim might have been similar.

Offline Vladki cz

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2019, 05:10:14 PM »

Offline Octavius

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2019, 08:22:58 PM »
Shunters can get pretty short, especially if designed to fit on a turntable together with the locos they move around in a depot.

Battery-powered Swiss shunter, built in the 1910s.

Offline Ters

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2019, 08:59:21 PM »
There is at least one tram serving alcohol (and food) in Norway as well, in Trondheim. Not on a fixed schedule, though. You have to charter it. I used the regular non-serving service when during my first year at college/university. This is how it looked going home (they started in the middle, so I link the last video first and the first video last, to give the upward trip; downward trip seems to be missing): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk6x7IPb5fE (except last two minutes, obviously) followed by https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fv5N3kN6TFo (I got off at 4:16 or 7:00, the former was nearer to where I lived and near a grocery store, while the latter was at the same height as where I lived and so better when I used my bicycle to and from the tram stop; I never went all the way up to the end). The trams may look familiar to someone down in Europe. They were bought used when someone reopened the tram line after all of Trondheim's tram lines were closed. Most of the original trams had been destroyed in a fire. The gauge is very unusual, at least for trams in Scandinavia.

As for other odd trams: Oslo had a grain tram. There is also a video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grBhzXDDq8s

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2019, 05:05:55 AM »
That was a wonderful journey - the tram you took, I mean. I wish we had trams like that all around here.

Offline Ters

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2019, 03:09:34 PM »
The view is much better going the other way. It was quite shaky most of the way, though. I think the line has become better now.

Too bad the video doesn't show them using the manual signaling that was sometimes used, although most of the equipment for it is there if you know what to look for. Basically, it consisted of the tram drivers handing a small stick to each other. If not directly, then by putting it on small turning mechanisms on poles.

Offline Freahk

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2019, 03:27:52 PM »
Code: [Select]
Basically, it consisted of the tram drivers handing a small stick to each otherFrom what I know this is called the one train staff working method (learned this from simutrans extended and a little bit of wikipedia :D)

That journey looks really wonderful and completely different from what most tram rides look like in Germany.

Offline Vladki cz

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2019, 04:24:15 PM »
Code: [Select]
Basically, it consisted of the tram drivers handing a small stick to each otherFrom what I know this is called the one train staff working method (learned this from simutrans extended and a little bit of wikipedia :D)

That journey looks really wonderful and completely different from what most tram rides look like in Germany.
Same signalling is used at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirnitzschtal_tramway

Offline Ters

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Re: Shawty
« Reply #13 on: December 05, 2019, 06:59:09 PM »
That journey looks really wonderful and completely different from what most tram rides look like in Germany.
Oslo and Trondheim both originally had and currently have such tram lines, whose purpose apparently partially was and is to get up into the surrounding hills, particularly for skiing. One in Oslo terminates at Holmenkollen, a major international venue for Nordic skiing events. The other terminates a bit further east, which is just a general recreational area, but they both share a bit of track. (There is perhaps another scenic tram line in Oslo, but it is fully within the urban area, for what is considered urban in Norway at least.)

The line in Trondheim does not go to the Nordic skiing venue (also used for international events, located further south), but it and the line to Holmenkollen are the scenic ones. The "regular" tram lines in Trondheim are gone. As mentioned, they were all closed down by the municipal government operating them, and only the one I posted videos of was reopened by a private company run by enthusiasts. That most of the tracks didn't run in the streets probably saved them. A short section was removed, so the current terminus in the city isn't the original one.

Oslo on the other hand ended up not closing down its tram lines. However, for some reason, the tram line to Holmenkollen had gotten connected to the subway system. It is now an integrated part of that, and not a tram line. This video shows the train exiting the subterranean parts and going up the hill. This is during the 2011 world championship, which the line had been upgraded and modernized for, so it is not as rustic as the line in Trondheim. Holmenkollen is by the way the Beverly Hills of Oslo.

For Bergen, a corresponding line might be Fløibanen. It is much shorter, much steeper, neither tram nor metro, and probably not used so much by skiers, but also has the purpose of getting people from the city center out into nature. Norwegians love nature. (Bergen once had trams, but closed them down. They have recently built a new light rail line.)