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Offline jamespetts gb

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GIT commits
« on: November 28, 2013, 11:37:40 PM »

(From XKCD.)

Offline IgorEliezer br

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2013, 01:19:14 AM »
What amazes me most is the fact there's a few or 1 hour between the commits and it went so bad in less than 24 hours.

Offline Ters

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2013, 05:59:08 AM »
I guess the rate of commits is what led to the nonsensical messages. In my experience a rapid rate of commits usually happen when you either tweak the code to satisfy a CI server, or because you tweak the code because you just felt like doing it.

Offline IgorEliezer br

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2013, 08:27:28 AM »
because you tweak the code because you just felt like doing it.
... and then your boss steps in and yell "stop tweaking!" D:

Offline Ters

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2013, 06:34:32 PM »
... and then your boss steps in and yell "stop tweaking!" D:

Not my boss. Too busy with meetings to check the VCS history. If I do it day after day, especially on a project I'm not project lead on, someone might begin to object, though.

Offline sdog

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2013, 11:19:11 PM »
i get the flurry of commits on the day before the deadline for my research evaluation and similar things. half of those commit are:

includes the 4 things i forgot in the previous commit
fixes the bug that was submitted with the previsous commit
changes line type for xyz to long-dash-dot in abc plot
fixes tpyo in throey stecion
forgot makefile befoe
adds new paragraph on somethign
text
typos
tweaks graphs
rubbish
incomplete new word added, to comment, stopping for tea


when i'm nervous my commits become infinitesimally small,
and i tend to push right after each commit. (perhaps some fear to loose the work done so far?)

Offline Ters

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2013, 09:06:00 AM »
There was a deadline at work yesterday, so I started ignoring the rule that every commit should be linked to a Jira issue. One of my commit messages was simply "Fix".

Offline Dwachs

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Offline Ters

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2013, 04:38:40 PM »
I can't say I understand why PHP isn't as good as provoking profanities as several of the other languages. Does it appeal to pious people or something?

Offline IgorEliezer br

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2013, 04:46:56 PM »
Does it appeal to pious people or something?
Internet is god. :x

Offline sdog

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2013, 05:29:32 PM »
perhaps for people doing most of the php other sources of frustration are so much greater that they explode there. For example SQL variants or javascript.

Offline Markohs

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2013, 05:31:25 PM »
javascript is way more annoying to program than php, imho. :)

Offline Ters

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2013, 06:52:39 PM »
perhaps for people doing most of the php other sources of frustration are so much greater that they explode there. For example SQL variants or javascript.

Sounds plausible, though I would expect that the same was true about ruby, which seems very popular for coding the server-side of web applications these days.

I feel grateful that I'm not doing javascript-based web applications, although doing Java on the client side has become much more difficult during the last year or so.

Offline sdog

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2013, 07:34:59 PM »
Quote
I feel grateful that I'm not doing javascript-based web applications, although doing Java on the client side has become much more difficult during the last year or so.

Why that? Java tunrime environment seems almost ubiquitous these days? Fear of vulnerabilities?



when git commit messages beat twitter:

10k patches per release

Offline Ters

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2013, 08:10:41 PM »
Why that? Java tunrime environment seems almost ubiquitous these days? Fear of vulnerabilities?

Vulnerabilities, and the problems associated with Oracle's attempts at addressing those vulnerabilities (at work, we have almost 400 identical issues in our Jira since June related to this, and a new problem is on the horizon).

In addition, Java runtime is also not available on smartphones and tablets, which is causing lots of troubles for banks that use a Java applet for secure authentication (which the major Norwegian banks do). While this is not a problem for the organization I work for, our application isn't really suited for anything but desktops, it is helping giving Java a bad reputation.

Offline Markohs

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2013, 08:27:59 PM »
Well, when I saw that java web start I thought it was a great idea, but the applet concept never was of my likes.

From the web/html perspective, java seems to not really fit into the equation. On the server side, at least what I've had to admin, tomcat, performs soo poorly and is very unstable and unsecure. I know there are bigger, more professional servers, but seem too complex from my point of view. A lightweight server(like apache/PHP or ruby), glued to the client with json and javascript looks much more flexible, and stable.

 I've allways thought java is atm the best programming platform for big projects, but looks like it's getting far from the web, I'd say it won't come back to web, never.

 And regarding mobile phones. Aren't android apps written in java? Just the core, because most of the UI handling are handled using iframes, embedded browsers in the app, and using javascript/html.

Offline Ters

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Re: GIT commits
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2013, 08:38:07 PM »
The Java as a platform is still popular on the server side, and other languages like Scala have joined the Java language as a language of choice for programming on the Java platform. Jetty is perhaps becomming a more popular alternative to Tomcat, and rather than deploying the applications to an application server (like typical Tomcat), the servers are launched from within the applications. I don't have much experience with that, since at work, we use full JEE commercial application servers (which are still actively developed, so I don't think we're alone). Java is also trying to embrace new trends in programming, but that have been put on hold for a while, while Oracle focuses on fixing the security vulnerabilities in the current Java.