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Offline jamespetts

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The Great Western Railway
« on: January 07, 2020, 04:57:29 PM »
Over the Christmas holidays (which for me continue until the end of the week), I have been working to improve the selection of Great Western Railway vehicles in the pakset, adding multiple liveries to all the available types (only the 517 class is yet to complete in this respect) and adding multiple classes to all the carriages. All of the carriages have been re-created from scratch with entirely new graphics, rendered using the transparent workflow, and all have class data. We currently have a complete timeline of express passenger carriages dating back to 1893 and all types dating back to 1908.

Here is some of the progress that has been made of late:


Hawksworth carriages of the 1940s


The Hawksworth auto-trailers of 1950


The GWR Swindon twin-set (existing item with improved graphics and multiple liveries)


The GWR single Swindon railcars


The GWR Gloucester railcar (existing item with multiple liveries)


The GWR "King" class - an existing item with multiple liveries, shown here in early British Railways blue livery, hauling some GWR Hawksworth carriages in their 1950s BR carmine and cream livery


The GWR "Grange" class


The GWR 2884 class (a development of the 2800 class)


The GWR 2800 class (an existing item with improved graphics and multiple liveries)


The GWR 5202 class


The GWR "sunshine" carriages of hte 1930s


The non-corridor version of the GWR "sunshine" carriages of the 1930s


The extra-luxurious GWR "super saloons", with level 5 catering



The GWR "bow ended" corridor carriages of the 1920s



The non-corridor versions of the GWR bow ended carriages


The GWR 4575 "small prairie" class


The GWR 4500 "small prairie" class hauling a pair of non-corridor brake composites known as a "B-set"


A GWR "Duke" class 4-4-0


A GWR "Badminton" class 4-4-0 hauling a mail train


A train of "toplight" corridor carriages in the GWR lake livery, hauled by a GWR "Star" class 4-6-0 (the latter was an existing item, but it now has multiple liveries)


The non-corridor versions of the "Toplight" carriages


The GWR steam railmotor


The GWR corridor clerestory carriages, hauled by a "Badminton" class in an earlier livery than that depicted above


The GWR "Aberdare" 2-6-0 class


The GWR "Achillies" class 4-2-2


The GWR "Mogul" 4300 class 2-6-0

Offline jamespetts

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Re: The Great Western Railway
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2020, 09:37:07 PM »
Here is the GWR "Barnum" class 2-4-0 of 1889 hauling a mail train:


Offline jamespetts

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Re: The Great Western Railway
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2020, 05:25:02 PM »
The GWR project is nearing a close as my Christmas holiday comes to an end: here are some of the more recent additions:


A GWR 517 class 0-4-2 in Dean livery hauling a rake of four wheeled carriages. The 517 has been in the pakset for some time, but now has all new graphics (correctly scaled), an original and rebuilt form (the rebuilt form is pictured) and multiple liveries.


A Dean Goods 0-6-0 freight engine hauling a rake of mixed wagons


A 69 class 0-6-0 hauling a rake of wagons; this is an early goods engine.


A 79 class 0-6-0 hauling a mineral train; this is a contemporary of the 69 class, but with smaller driving wheels, giving a higher tractive effort but a lower maximum speed.


A Metro tank 2-4-0 hauling a rake of four wheeled suburban carriages, the locomotive pictured in the distinctive if short-lived 1870s era livery of a very dark green picked out with a bright grass green on tank and tender sides.


The same engine in the later Dean era livery hauling suburban clerestory carriages of the 1890s.


The Queen class 2-2-2, a large single driver express engine of the 1870s used on many the (standard gauge) principal services for circa 30 years.


The 806 class 2-4-0, a mixed traffic engine, shown here hauling a mail train


The 3751 class 0-4-2T, an enlarged and more powerful version of the 517 class, shown here hauling a rake of suburban four wheel carriages in the distinctive lake livery of 1912.


The 717 class 2-4-0 mixed traffic engine, shown here hauling a rake of clerestory 6 wheel carriages of the later 1870s. This locomotive, too, carries the 1870s dark green livery.


The "Birdcage" 3600 class 2-4-2T engine, hauling a rake of suburban clerestory carriages in the dark brown livery of 1908.

Offline jamespetts

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Re: The Great Western Railway
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2020, 10:38:01 PM »
Here is the GWR 1813 class of 0-6-0 tank engines, shown here before being rebuilt as a pannier tank:

and here after such a rebuild:


Edit: And here is another view of the rebuilt 1813 class, in the later Churchward livery:

« Last Edit: January 13, 2020, 12:25:57 AM by jamespetts »

Offline jamespetts

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Re: The Great Western Railway
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2020, 12:23:20 AM »
As my elongated Christmas holiday draws to a close, so does the GWR project. This is the final instalment, and all the vehicles here should be in the version of the pakset available to download from to-morrow morning.


This is the GWR "Buffalo" class of saddle tank, later rebuilt into a pannier tank version, shown here in its original form with pre-1875 livery, hauling a short mixed freight train.


This is the GWR 850 class of 0-6-0 saddle tank, a smaller engine than the "Buffalo" whose low axle loading allows it to operate on lightly laid lines, as pictured here. Shown in late 19th century Dean era livery. These, too, were rebuilt as pannier tanks, and the rebuilt versions are also now part of the pakset.


Another early pannier tank rebuilt from a saddle tank is the 2021 class. The rebuilt version (shown here) can work with autotrailers (as depicted), and can also be built new until the newer classes become available.


One of the later generation of pannier tanks, this 5400 class was built after 1930. It has larger driving wheels than other GWR pannier tank classes, allowing higher top speeds at the expense of lower tractive effort.


This is the 6400 class of pannier tank, built after 1932; it is the smaller wheeled cousin of the 5400 class, allowing for higher tractive effort at the expense of maximum speed. These are able to work with auto-trailers, as pictured here.


Finally, here is the GWR 1600 class, another small pannier tank, designed by the GWR but not built until 1949, by which time the GWR had ceased to exist. Shown here in BR black livery hauling a rake of GWR suburban carriages also built after nationalisation.

Offline Freahk

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Re: The Great Western Railway
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2020, 12:40:43 AM »
I like these "auto trailers", for some reason i did not use these ingame yet but will definitely do so when I can.
I also want to thank you for that impressive work.

Offline jamespetts

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Re: The Great Western Railway
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2020, 01:00:29 AM »
I like these "auto trailers", for some reason i did not use these ingame yet but will definitely do so when I can.
I also want to thank you for that impressive work.

You are most welcome.

Offline Matthew

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Re: The Great Western Railway
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2020, 11:23:34 AM »
Thank you for creating these, James. :thumbsup: The railcars and auto-trailers add some flexibility to the end of the steam era. And it's also great to have more GWR options throughout the steam era, so that it's easier to build a complete network with a consistent livery.